pantherpause: Oh dear, you’ve come as the wro…

pantherpause:

Oh dear, you’ve come as the wrong period of history. Never mind, join us anyway.

pantherpause: We’re going to go from guess wo…

pantherpause:

We’re going to go from guess work to “Field” work.

yeahwehadatime: boysandvoodoo: Noel Fielding…

yeahwehadatime:

boysandvoodoo:

Noel Fielding – Letter to My Younger Self
The Big Issue in the North, 20-26 February 2012

What would you say to your 16-year-old self if you could go back in time?

Noel Fielding surreal comedian, 38

The Big Issue in the North | 20-26 February 2012 | Jane Graham

I was obsessed with football when I was 16. I was skillful winger and plating regular semi-pro. I hated school, except drawing, so I thought I’d either go to art school or become a footballer. I looked like a girl. I had long blonde hair and was very skinny. I remember being in a pub with my mate when I was at college and a woman came up to him and asked if he’d like to buy a rose for his girlfriend. I was furious.

I was definitely a late developer. But I think that’s quite good. There were boys in my year who looked like big massive men and they went out with grown-up women. They seemed to peak when they were 15. But you see then now and the look much older. You have all the time in the world to grow up. I don’t think you should rush it. it breaks my heart seeing kids at 11 these days, all grown up – is that it then, childhood’s over in 10 years?

If I met the teenage me now and someone told me he’d go on to do stand-up comedy and be quite outgoing and be on telly, I’d think, no way. I was quite sweet but I was very shy. And I didn’t look cool – I wore some bad chavvy clothes and had a terrible wedge haircut. But I think I’d see a glimmer of hope in that boy’s eyes, a sign of the art student, the beads and the strange ponchos to come.

The first time I did stand-up I was terrified. I did some performance art at college where I dressed up as Jesus, jumped off a big cross and danced like Mick Jagger. I had a water pistol with holy water in it. That went well so I booked some real gigs, but I constantly worried my stuff wouldn’t work. In those early days of stand-up I made myself ill worrying. I got hepatitis, which is made worse by stress. I’d do a spate of gigs and knock myself back and end up on the sofa for six months.

When I met Julian [Barratt, Fielding’s partner in The Mighty Boosh] it felt a bit like meeting a soul mate. My friends had told me I’d love him. They said he was a bit crazy and jazzy and he had no jokes. I thought he was amazing. I went up to him and said: “I’m just like you!” I think he just thought I was some weird kid but a couple of years later, of course, we were working together. Somehow out chemistry was there from the beginning.

I came from a working class background and I wasn’t very academic so I always thought everyone else knew more than me. I’d tell my younger self not to worry about that – no one knows what they’re doing. I think there’s a little bit of an attitude in some working class areas – “What, you’re going to go off and be a comedian are you, mate?” I’d tell the younger me not to listen to anyone lese. Take some risks – you’ve only got one life and it goes faster and faster.

If I could relive one day it would be the day I got into Croydon Art College. I didn’t get in at first, I was on the reserve list. I was hanging round with other people who didn’t have jobs and didn’t know what hey were going to do. Then I got a call telling me someone had dropped out and I had got into college. It was like a tiny door opening, an escape, and I thought – yes!

Beat about the Boosh

yeahwehadatime:

04 February 2006 |

The Scotsman

IT IS MONDAY, 23 JANUARY. According to a formula devised by a Cardiff University psychologist, this is the gloomiest day of the year. Yet, despite the dire warnings, cult comedy hipsters the Mighty Boosh are not having a particularly blue Monday.

“Well I’m pretty hungover this morning,” concedes Julian Barratt, the tall, northern, more deadpan half of the Boosh duo. “That’s quite gloomy.”

Noel Fielding – shorter, younger, southerner, a man who fastidiously looks after his rock-star coiffure and never balks when a role “demands” cross-dressing – is having none of the theory. “I woke up this morning and swans carried me around the room and animals came through the window and combed my hair. There were harps playing. It was all good for me, so this guy doesn’t know what he’s on about. It would be good to find out where he lives and try and make his day special.”

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